Baby loses all four limbs after throat infection turns to sepsis and tot’s leg comes off in mum’s hand

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A BABY has lost all four limbs after a throat infection turned into sepsis, just days before his limb came off in his mum’s hand.

Brave 11-month-old Oliver Aisthorpe has made a miraculous recovery after doctors warned mum Abigail Wardle, 23, that her son wasn’t going to pull through.

Caters News Agency

Brave 11-month-old Oliver Aisthorpe has lost all his limbs in a brutal battle with sepsis[/caption]

Caters News Agency

Little Oliver is now all smiles despite being ‘at death’s door in 48hrs’[/caption]

Caters News Agency

Oliver has now made a miraculous recovery despite not having fingers or toes[/caption]

Even after beating the infection, Abigail, from Cleethorpes, Lincs, had to endure the horror of Oliver’s leg self-amputating and coming away in her hand as she held him in his hospital bed.

But now, just a few weeks on, Oliver is back home and making an incredible recovery – and medics even hope he could have his first prosthetic legs fitted in a few months.

SPEAKING OUT

Courageous Abigail has chosen to speak out about their sepsis hell in a bid to help other parents learn how to spot the signs of the killer bug that little Oliver caught through an undiagnosed throat infection.

Abigail, a jewellery designer, said: “Some people might feel sorry for us but I feel like the luckiest mum in the world – I still have Oliver with us – he might not have any hands or feet but he is still my smiley, brave little boy.

“What we went through was horrendous and I had never been so scared in my life.

“But Oliver was so brave that I knew I had to be brave too. I am his mum and it’s my job to fight for him and make him feel safe.

He went from laughing and giggling to death’s door within 48 hours and nobody knew what was wrong with him


Abigail Wardle

“He went from laughing and giggling to death’s door within 48 hours and nobody knew what was wrong with him.

“I don’t want any other family to go through what we went through, and so I want everyone to be more aware of sepsis – families but also GPs, who sometimes don’t have the specialist paediatric training available to spot it.

“I want some good to come out of what happened to Oliver.”

SEPSIS BATTLE

Abigail first took her son to an out-of-hours GP on Saturday, March 16, when she noticed his soft spot appeared to be sunken and she worried he was dehydrated.

But she says a GP sent her home and told her to give him fluids and Calpol.

But by the next day, he had deteriorated – and Abigail again took Oliver to see an out of hours GP.

What is sepsis?

Sepsis is a life-threatening reaction to an infection.

It happens when your immune system overreacts to an infection and starts to damage your body’s own tissues and organs.

You cannot catch sepsis from another person.

It happens when your body overreacts to an infection.

Sepsis is sometimes called septicaemia or blood poisoning.

It can be especially hard to spot in: babies and young children, people with dementia, people with a learning disability and people who have difficulty communicating.

Sepsis needs treatment in hospital straight away because it can get worse quickly.

You should get antibiotics within 1 hour of arriving at hospital.

If sepsis is not treated early, it can turn into septic shock and cause your organs to fail. This is life threatening.

Source: NHS

Doctors discovered that the sepsis had developed from an undiagnosed throat infection – which Oliver had never shown any symptoms of.

They managed to stabilise Oliver but warned Abigail that if he deteriorated they would not be able to save him.

Incredibly, the little boy pulled through – and survived with no damage to his brain, but the sepsis has caused both hands and his legs to turn black and effectively die off.

LIFE WITHOUT LIMBS

Medics battled to save length in Oliver’s leg, but mum Abigail begged them to speed the operation along because she could see the leg self-amputating.

She said: “The limbs were heavy and uncomfortable – Oliver was miserable, I know it sounds like an odd thing for a mother to say but I was desperate for them to take them off.

Once he had his limbs removed, he was like a different child – so happy and full of life, it seemed like a relief for him


Abigail Wardle

“One day, a nurse was helping me lift Oliver from his bouncy chair back into the bed, and his leg just came away.

“Once he had his limbs removed, he was like a different child – so happy and full of life, it seemed like a relief for him.”

Last month, Oliver was discharged from hospital and is now getting used to life without his limbs.

Abigail added: “I am just so proud of Oliver.

“He has taken everything in his stride and is just so incredibly resilient. He makes me smile every day.

“Already, he is trying to work out how to roll over and play with his toys with his stumps.”


She added: “I could have come out of the other end of this with no son, so that’s what I focus on.

“We have our bad days, but I know that there will be better days to come.

“I want his story to be used to help spread awareness and teach other parents and GPs who maybe don’t have specialist paediatric training, about the signs of sepsis.”

Caters News Agency

Doctors discovered that the sepsis had developed from an undiagnosed throat infection[/caption]

Caters News Agency

Doctors warned mum Abigail Wardle, 23, that her son wasn’t going to pull through[/caption]

Caters News Agency

Little Oliver pictured before the deadly disease took away his limbs[/caption]


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