Home U.S COVID-19: Dr Anthony Fauci says Santa Claus 'immune' from infection

COVID-19: Dr Anthony Fauci says Santa Claus 'immune' from infection


Santa Claus won’t have any worries dropping off presents this Christmas season because he’s immune to the coronavirus, Dr. Anthony Fauci said.

‘Santa is exempt from this because Santa, of all the good qualities, has a lot of good innate immunity,’ Fauci, infectious disease expert and member of the White House coronavirus task force, told USA Today.   

With the US inundated by more than 11million confirmed coronavirus cases and 252,000 deaths, children worried that Santa Claus’ typical Christmas Eve ride could leave him exposed as he visits millions of homes. 

Dr. Anthony Fauci (pictured) revealed that Santa Claus is 'immune' to COVID-19 and won't face problems on his Christmas Eve journey this year

Dr. Anthony Fauci (pictured) revealed that Santa Claus is ‘immune’ to COVID-19 and won’t face problems on his Christmas Eve journey this year 

Sydney Poulos, 8, gives Santa a fist bump through a transparent barrier at a Bass Pro Shop in Bridgeport, Connecticut, this holiday season

Sydney Poulos, 8, gives Santa a fist bump through a transparent barrier at a Bass Pro Shop in Bridgeport, Connecticut, this holiday season

‘Santa is not going to be spreading any infections to anybody,’ Dr. Fauci told USA Today. 

But Santa Claus has already taken precautions by offering Zoom calls to families and limiting his appearances at nationwide malls.

Recently, it was revealed some shopping centers will use a sheet of plexiglass to separate Santa Claus from excited children to promote social distancing. 

Health experts have warned Americans against the ‘twindemic,’ or the intersection of the coronavirus pandemic and flu season. 

Many experts, including Fauci, have urged people to get flu vaccines this year to avoid compounding illnesses and an overworked healthcare system.

‘It is a serious disease; it is not trivial. Let’s do what we can with the tools that we have, and we have a good tool in an influenza vaccine,’ he told Healthline  in October.  

Dr. Peter Hotez, dean of the National School of Tropical Medicine at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, told USA Today that he hoped Santa received a coronavirus vaccine when they become available.

A man dressed as Santa Claus sitting behind a plexiglass barrier due to the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic speaks with a boy and girl at the Willow Grove Park Mall in Willow Grove, Pennsylvania

A man dressed as Santa Claus sitting behind a plexiglass barrier due to the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic speaks with a boy and girl at the Willow Grove Park Mall in Willow Grove, Pennsylvania

‘I hear the ventilation in Santa’s workshop is not the best, and opening windows in North Pole winters problematic,’ said Hotez.

‘The good news is that mask compliance there is pretty good, and the elves are committed to social distancing. Mrs. Claus has implemented a program of regular testing and the reindeers now lead contact tracing,’

On Friday, Pfizer Inc. announced it will apply for emergency use authorization of its COVID-19 vaccine with the Food and Drug Administration.

The application to the FDA comes just days after Pfizer and German partner BioNTech SE reported final trial results that showed the vaccine was 95 percent effective in preventing COVID-19 with no major safety concerns.

The companies expect the FDA to grant emergency use by mid-December and said they will begin shipping doses almost immediately.

Officials have said they hope to have about 20 million of Pfizer’s vaccine doses, which is enough to vaccinate 10 million Americans, by the end of the year. 

Pfizer Inc will apply for emergency use authorization of its COVID-19 vaccine with the Food and Drug Administration today - a major step toward providing protection against the coronavirus for pandemic-weary Americans

Pfizer Inc will apply for emergency use authorization of its COVID-19 vaccine with the Food and Drug Administration today – a major step toward providing protection against the coronavirus for pandemic-weary Americans

A COVID Christmas! Santa dishes out fist-bumps to kids through Plexiglas because sitting on his lap is strictly off limits at malls across the US this season

Santa Claus is coming to the mall – just don´t try to sit on his lap.

Despite the pandemic – and the fact that Santa’s age and weight put him at high risk for severe illness from the coronavirus – mall owners are going ahead with plans to bring him back this year.

But they are doing all they can to keep the jolly old man safe, including banning kids from sitting on his knee, no matter if they’ve been naughty or nice.

Kids will instead tell Santa what they want for Christmas from six feet away, and sometimes from behind a sheet of plexiglass. 

Santa and his visitors may need to wear a face mask, even while posing for photos. And some malls will put faux gift boxes and other decorations in front of Saint Nick to block kids from charging toward him 

Pictured: Julianna, 3, and Dylan, 5, Lasczak visit with Santa through a transparent barrier at Bass Pro Shop in Bridgeport, Connecticut, Tuesday, November 10

Pictured: Julianna, 3, and Dylan, 5, Lasczak visit with Santa through a transparent barrier at Bass Pro Shop in Bridgeport, Connecticut, Tuesday, November 10 

Other safety measures include online reservations to cut down on lines, workers wiping down holiday-decorated sets, and hand sanitizer aplenty. Santa´s hours are also getting cut to give him a break from crowds.

It comes as the United States surpassed 11million coronavirus cases and 246,000 deaths.

Macy´s canceled its in-person visits this year, saying it couldn´t provide a safe environment for the more than 250,000 people that show up to see Kriss Kringle at its New York flagship store.

But malls, which have struggled to attract shoppers for years, are not willing to kill a holiday tradition that is one of their biggest ways to lure people during the all-important holiday shopping season.

‘You have to give them a reason to come or they´ll stay home and shop online,’ says Michael Brown, who oversees the retail team at consulting firm Kearney.

More than 10 million U.S. households visited Santa in a mall or store last year, according to GlobalData Retail´s managing director Neil Saunders. Nearly 73 per cent of them also spent money at nearby restaurants or stores, he says.

‘Santa is the magnet that attracts people to malls and without that attraction, malls will struggle more to generate foot traffic,’ says Saunders.

Mall operator CBL, which filed for bankruptcy earlier this month, plans to bring Santa to nearly 60 malls at the end of November, about three weeks later than last year. 

The company decided against a plexiglass barrier because it didn´t look right in photos. But Santa will be socially distanced and wear a face mask. He may also put on a plastic shield to protect his face.

Some malls will require children to sit behind plexiglass walls while visiting Santa Claus this holiday season. Pictured: Gracelynn Blumenfeld, 8, visits with Santa through a transparent barrier at a Bass Pro Shop in Bridgeport, Connecticut

Some malls will require children to sit behind plexiglass walls while visiting Santa Claus this holiday season. Pictured: Gracelynn Blumenfeld, 8, visits with Santa through a transparent barrier at a Bass Pro Shop in Bridgeport, Connecticut

‘We´re doing everything possible so that he stays healthy,’ says Mary Lynn Morse, CBL’s marketing vice president.

Mall owner Brookfield started planning in-person Santa visits at 130 of its shopping centers in April, opting for sleighs and gift boxes where visitors can sit away from Santa. 

At one of its malls, The SoNo Collection in Norwalk, Connecticut, a round piece of plexiglass will be placed in front of Santa so it looks like he´s inside a snow globe.

But the precautions may not be enough to convince some shoppers.

‘It just seems like such a bad idea, just being in a mall,’ says Emma Wallace of Alexandria, Virginia, who decided against taking her toddler to his first visit with Santa this year.

‘We´re just so sad,’ she says. ‘We were really looking forward to that picture that seems like every parent has, where they´re sort of terrified or just bemused by the whole Santa thing.’

LaToya Booker cleans a transparent barrier between visitors for Santa at a Bass Pro Shop in Bridgeport, Connecticut, where staffers have implemented health guidelines

LaToya Booker cleans a transparent barrier between visitors for Santa at a Bass Pro Shop in Bridgeport, Connecticut, where staffers have implemented health guidelines 

A man dressed as Santa Claus wears a protective face shield at Capital City Mall in Lower Allen Township, Pennsylvania, on Wednesday

A man dressed as Santa Claus wears a protective face shield at Capital City Mall in Lower Allen Township, Pennsylvania, on Wednesday

Malls realize many people may stay home. Cherry Hill Programs, which will bring Santa to more than 700 malls, is also offering Zoom calls with him for the first time in its 60-year history.

And Brookfield teamed up with virtual Santa company JingleRing, giving people a way to chat with Santa from home.

Ed Taylor, a Santa who typically spends several months in Los Angeles filming TV spots and making mall appearances, will stay at home in southern Oregon this year.

‘When you think about the high risk profile for COVID, you´re kind of drawing a picture of Santa,’ Taylor says.

He´ll be doing video calls with families and has been holding online classes to get other Santas camera-ready. Meeting kids virtually means getting them to speak up more, since the calls usually run seven minutes – about twice as long as mall visits, where the main objective is to snap a good picture.

While his mother Diana Sosa (left) watches, Jayden Dicks, 6, has his temperature checked before visiting with Santa Claus

While his mother Diana Sosa (left) watches, Jayden Dicks, 6, has his temperature checked before visiting with Santa Claus 

Sisters Harper, left, and Emmersyn Houck, of Duncannon, Pa., visits with Santa Claus, with safety protocols in place, at Capital City Mall in Lower Allen Township,  Pa., on Wednesday, Nov. 11, 2020.  Malls are doing all they can to keep the jolly old man safe from the coronavirus, including banning kids from sitting on his knee, completely changing what a Santa visit looks like. (Dan Gleiter/The Patriot-News via AP)

Sisters Harper, left, and Emmersyn Houck, of Duncannon, Pa., visits with Santa Claus, with safety protocols in place, at Capital City Mall in Lower Allen Township, Pa., on Wednesday, Nov. 11, 2020. Malls are doing all they can to keep the jolly old man safe from the coronavirus, including banning kids from sitting on his knee, completely changing what a Santa visit looks like. (Dan Gleiter/The Patriot-News via AP)

Stephanie Soares: 'Even though we´re in a pandemic, it´s important that the kids are still able to be kids and still keep up with the regular traditions'

 Stephanie Soares: ‘Even though we´re in a pandemic, it´s important that the kids are still able to be kids and still keep up with the regular traditions’

Going online gives Santa a chance to experiment with his attire. Some may ditch the formal red suit for vests and rolled up sleeves, since Santa is presumably calling from the North Pole and running a toy workshop full of busy elves.

‘Up at home, we´re working,’ says Taylor. ‘We have presents to make. We´ve got reindeer to feed.’

But there´s some parts of Santa´s look that can´t change. JingleRing, which has signed up more than 400 Santas, held online training sessions on how to use at-home bleaching kits to transform gray hair and beards into Santa´s snow white hue. They were also advised to buy teeth whitening strips.

‘Santa can´t have smoker´s teeth,’ says Walt Geer, who co-founded JingleRing this year after realizing people may need a new way to meet Santa.

Stephanie Soares is sticking to the old way. She brought her daughter, Gia, to a Bass Pro Sports store last week in Bridgeport, Connecticut, to take a picture with Santa, who wore a clear plastic face shield and sat behind a glare-free acrylic barrier that sometimes made it hard to hear what the kids were saying. A worker sprayed down the barrier after each visit.

‘Even though we´re in a pandemic, it´s important that the kids are still able to be kids and still keep up with the regular traditions,’ says Soares.    

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

Most Popular

Family denies boy who shot himself during Zoom class committed suicide

The devastated family of an 11-year-old California boy who died after he shot himself during a Zoom class is pushing back against reports...

Jeremy Clarkson slammed by Will Mellor for being 'rude' 'Should've caved every rib he had'

In a recent interview, the 60-year-old said: “I think you only have to look on Wikipedia and go, ‘No, not this one’.“I’m hardly...

Three US Marshals are injured and fugitive is shot dead in early morning Bronx shootout

BREAKING NEWS: Three US Marshals are injured and fugitive is shot...

Recent Comments