Diabetes type 2 – does your skin look like this? The itchy blisters you shouldn’t ignore

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Diabetes is a common condition that affects more than four million people in the UK, and 90 per cent of cases are caused by type 2 diabetes. The condition could be caused by the body not producing enough of the hormone insulin, or the body not reacting to insulin. Without enough insulin, the body struggles to convert sugar in the blood into useable energy. You could be at risk of high blood sugar if you notice tiny, and sometimes itchy, blisters on your skin.

A patch of small blisters on your skin could be a warning sign of a skin infection, according to the American Academy of Dermatology.

Getting frequent skin infections may be caused by underlying diabetes, it warned.

Your skin may also feel hot or swollen, and the blisters may be joined by weeping sores.

“Diabetes can affect many parts of your body, including your skin,” it said. “When diabetes affects the skin, it’s often a sign that your blood sugar levels are too high.

“This could mean that you have undiagnosed diabetes or prediabetes, or your treatment for diabetes needs to be adjusted.

“People who have diabetes tend to get skin infections. If you have a skin infection, you’ll notice one or more of the following: hot, swollen skin that is painful, an itchy rash and sometimes tiny blisters, dry scaly skin, or a white discharge that looks like cottage cheese.

“A skin infection can occur on any area of your body, including between your toes, around one or more of your nails, and on your scalp.

“Tell your doctor if you have frequent skin infections. You could have undiagnosed diabetes.”

Similarly, if you’ve already been diagnosed with diabetes and keep getting skin infections, it may be a sign that your condition needs to be better controlled, it added.

You could also be at risk of diabetes if you notice giant blisters developing on your skin.

These blisters tend to form on the hands, feet, legs or forearms, and appear similar to blisters that appear after a serious burn.

May people may be living with diabetes without even knowing it, because the symptoms don’t necessarily make you feel unwell.

Other more common diabetes symptoms include extreme fatigue, having an unquenchable thirst, and having cuts or wounds that take longer to heal than normal.

You should speak to a doctor if you’re worried about the warning signs or symptoms of diabetes.

But you could lower your risk of the condition by eating a healthy, balanced diet, and by doing regular exercise.

Everyone should aim to do at least 150 minutes of moderate-intensity activity every week.

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