eBay: 'Rare' Battle of Hastings 50p coin selling for £4,000 – but what's it really worth?

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For those looking for rare coins, eBay has become the place to go. A huge number of sellers have listed coins on the auction site at extremely high prices, with sets going for even more. One such piece is this Battle of Hastings 50p coin, which was recently listed on the site for a whopping £4,000 – 8000 times its face value. In the description, the seller “liblu7” – who is also selling another rare 50p piece for a much lower price of £50 – branded the item “rare”. However, this isn’t necessarily the case.

The Battle of Hastings 50p coin is one of the most sought after in circulation, but it’s not technically rare.

It was created to remember the day when King Harold II was defeated by William the Conqueror, leading to the collapse of the English army.

The Battle of Hastings was fought on the 14th of October 1066 between the French Army, led by Duke William II, and the English Army led by King Harold.

King Harold was eventually defeated by William who then became known as William the Conqueror; he was crowned the first Norman King of Great Britain.

The coin, which commemorates the 1066 battle, was printed by the Royal Mint in 2016 when it first entered circulation.

There are around 6.7 million of them about. Nevertheless, Battle of Hastings 50p coins are known to sell for huge fees.

Why has the seller priced it so highly?

The price an object is put on sale for on eBay is up to the seller and does not necessarily reflect its actual value, which could explain why some coins are listed for as much as £8,000 on the auction site.

By shopping around, those who are on the hunt for the coin of the famous battle could save a lot of money.

As well as this, it is wise to check with a coin expert before parting with a large sum of cash for a coin.

Phil Mussell and the production team at Coin News Magazine have issued a warning in their guide Spend it? Save it? What should you do?, which was released in association with the Royal Mint.

They advise that it’s up to the seller as to how much they put the item up for sale for.

And, astonishingly high price tags can make more affordable listings seem much more appealing.

But, more often than not, the coins aren’t even worth that, so the buyer still ends up paying more than it is worth.

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