Engineer repairing vintage 1960s synth goes on NINE-HOUR acid trip after touching knob coated in LSD

0
39


AN ENGINEER repairing a 1960s era synthesizer accidentally went on an acid trip after absorbing LSD on a the machine’s knob.  

Eliot Curtis was repairing the device that had been abandoned long ago in a cupboard in California when he began tripping out.

This Buchla Model 100 synthesizer was at the heart of the 1960s counter culture
This Buchla Model 100 synthesizer was at the heart of the 1960s counter culture with its mind bending sounds 
KPIX
Eliot Curtis began feeling very strange indeed after he began servicing the machine
Eliot Curtis began feeling very strange indeed after he began servicing the machine
KPIX
Eliot had been cleaning the synth when he said he touched a substance
Eliot had been cleaning the synth when he said he touched a substance
KPIX

Eliot told KPIX Television: “It felt like I was tripping on LSD… a strange tingling sensation.”

His unscheduled psychedelic adventure began while he was repairing  Buchla Model 100 synthesizer which had been found in a closet in California State University East Bay in San Francisco.

Eliot recalled removing a module and cleaning what appeared to be “a crust or a crystalline residue”.

While he was doing so he said the substance dissolved on his fingers.

And after about 45 minutes he began feeling strange and was soon embarking on a nine hour LSD trip.

Tests afterwards confirmed this.

It felt like I was tripping on LSD… a strange tingling sensation


Engineer Eliot Curtis

The inventor of lysergic acid diethylamide or LSD, Swiss scientist Albert Hofmann, discovered the drug after absorbing it through his finger tips in 1943 before feeling the effects while cycling home.

Studies suggest psychedelic drug can be stored for an indefinite amount of time – so  long as it is kept in a cool, dark and preferably air-tight space.

And the synth had been kept in just such a place.


 

Add to this the fact that this particular Buchla Model 100 was created by the late Don Buchla of the University of California, Berkeley and some of them ended up on a bus bought by LSD advocate Ken Kesey in 1966.

The plot thickens when Buchla, who died in 2016, himself was pals with Grateful Dead sound engineer Owsley Stanley who was famous for making the purest LSD.

Some are speculating that the electronic music machine was coated in the drug to stimulate creativity among the musicians using it.

Buchla Model 100 maker Don Buchla
Buchla Model 100 maker Don Buchla

//players.brightcove.net/5067014667001/default_default/index.min.js


We pay for your stories! Do you have a story for The Sun Online news team? Email us at tips@the-sun.co.uk or call 0207 782 4368. You can WhatsApp us on 07810 791 502. We pay for videos too. Click here to upload yours.


 

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here