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EU to surrender: Brussels' 'extreme' fishing stance in Brexit trade row set to unravel

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King’s College London Professor of European Politics and Foreign Affairs and Director of UK in a Changing Europe, Anand Menon, exposed a crucial issue with the EU’s fishing argument. While on TalkRadio with Mike Graham, Professor Menon explained the EU will have to concede on their fishing access demands during the Brexit trade talks. Professor Menon argued that the EU has shown inconsistency in its trade talk stance.

He noted the EU has repeatedly told the UK they cannot have the same benefits of being a member state while being out of the EU, while at the same time asking for the exact same access to the UK fishing waters.

Mr Graham questioned how Professor Menon felt about the red lines set by the EU and the UK.

He questioned Professor Menon how the UK and European Union would be able to come to a resolution on the contentious issue of fishing.

Professor Menon said: “Well on fishing, it strikes me that the EU have a very maximalist position.

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“This position is that in all other areas of the negotiations is the EU has said to us you are leaving and things can’t be the same when you are no longer a member state.

“But with fisheries, they say you are leaving but we want exactly the same access to your waters when you were a member state.

“It seems to me that the EU is going to have to give some ground on this.”

Professor Menon also considered the other areas the EU would have to concede in the Brexit trade talks.

He closed by saying: “I think our Government has to come up with a slightly larger quota for British fisherman.

“This is because expectations in the fishing communities are very high.

“Bear in mind, like in so many areas, the key thing about fisheries is we are interdependent.

“We sell the majority of the fish we catch and we import the majority of the fish we eat so it makes sense on both sides to find a solution.”



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