Home Life & Style Insomnia symptoms: What is insomnia, what causes it?

Insomnia symptoms: What is insomnia, what causes it?


Insomnia affects one in three Brits, and nearly a quarter of us admit to only getting five hours of shut eye a night. Adults need between seven and nine hours of sleep a night, and failing to get enough sleep can leave you feeling tired all the time. So what is insomnia and what causes it?

What is insomnia?

Insomnia is a common sleep disorder that makes it difficult for you to fall asleep.

The symptoms are different for everyone, but it always leads to sleep deprivation and feeling tired.

Insomnia can last for a matter of months or even years.

Take the Sleepio sleep self-assessment to find out if you have a problem. 

READ MORE-  How to sleep: Supplement to help you sleep better

What causes insomnia?

The most common causes of insomnia are:

  • stress, anxiety or depression
  • noise
  • a room that’s too hot or cold
  • uncomfortable beds
  • alcohol, caffeine or nicotine
  • recreational drugs like cocaine or ecstasy
  • jet lag
  • shift work

However, your insomnia could also be caused by a mental health condition such as schizophrenia or bipolar disorder.

Other causes of insomnia include Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, restless legs syndrome, overactive thyroid, and other conditions.

It’s important to rule out these health concerns before trying to cure your insomnia with simple methods.

The NHS website also notes that things like long-term pain, sleepwalking, snoring, narcolepsy, or nightmares or night terrors could be causing your insomnia.

DON’T MISS…
How to sleep: Foods to avoid for better sleep  [INSIGHT]
Sleep: How to fall asleep quicker  [INFORMER]
How to sleep: How to sleep in the heat  [EXPLAINER]

Ori Leslau, sleep expert and founder of Kally Sleep has revealed his top tips to cure insomnia.

He said: “Insomnia can be a real problem, making it hard to get through the day.

“Long term sleep deprivation can zap your energy, put you in a bad mood and even lead to physical and mental health issues, so sorting it out is vital.

“A good place to start is by making sure you have at least 30 minutes of quiet ‘winding down’ time before you go to bed.

“Dim the lights slightly and have a nice relaxing bath or read a book.”

Blue light is terrible for insomnia, so make sure to switch off electronic devices such as mobile phones, laptops and tablets at the same time.

Ori said: “This is because when they’re on, the light from their screens can put your brain in daytime mode so making it harder to nod off.”

You should also stop smoking, drinking alcohol, tea or coffee at least six hours before going to bed, and avoid eating a big meal late at night.

Ori’s final tip is to calm down your mind with something that relaxes you.

He suggested: “Finally, slow your mind down by doing some meditation or deep breathing exercises, or perhaps some light yoga.”



LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

Most Popular

PSG and Stoke flop Jese Rodriguez flouts social distancing rules as he jets to the Canary Islands

PSG and Stoke flop Jese Rodriguez flouts social distancing rules as...

Meghan Markle 'using opportunity for women to talk about miscarriage in such an open way'

Tommy’s midwife Sophie King told Express.co.uk: “Baby loss at any stage in pregnancy is one of the most heart-breaking things a family can...

Lung cancer: A small pupil in one of your eyes could be a sign of the deadly disease

Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is a type of primary lung cancer, meaning cells began multiplying uncontrollably in the organ. Making up about...

Khabib Nurmagomedov drops HUGE hint he will return to the UFC just one month after retiring

Khabib Nurmagomedov drops HUGE hint he will return to the UFC...

Recent Comments