Met Office weather warning as 60mph winds and torrential rain to trigger UK travel chaos

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Winds of up to 60mph will hit coastal areas throughout Saturday, while storms batter Scotland and parts of the north of England.

Two separate Met Office weather warnings are in place today, with fears of travel chaos on roads and rail.

A yellow warning for wind is covering all of the south of England, Midlands, Wales, East Anglia and much of the North West.

Gusts of 40-50mph are expected to hit inland.

In Scotland, Northern Ireland and the North East, a yellow weather warning for thunderstorms is in place until tomorrow morning.

Met Office weather warning

WARNING: The Met Office has told Brits to expect more travel difficulties today (Pic: PA/MET OFFICE)

The weather will be unseasonably stormy for August, coming just weeks after most of the UK was sweltering in the hottest July on record.

Met Office chief meteorologist Steve Ramsdale said: “People are used to that level of wind in the winter.

“Believe it or not this is supposed to be peak summer.

“There are a lot of people travelling but there are also children on holidays, a lot of people travelling to different parts of the country and a lot of people want to go on holiday.”

He warned: “Caravans and tents are susceptible to those stronger winds.

“Believe it or not this is supposed to be peak summer”

Steve Ramsdale, Met Office chief meteorologist

This week, two separate British music festivals had to be called off at short notice due to the miserable weather.

Boardmasters festival in Cornwall was cancelled on Wednesday before organisers at Houghton festival in Norfolk called the event off on Thursday.

Steve went on: “There are a lot of outdoor events with temporary structures which are not necessarily able to withstand this level of wind.”

Showers are forecast for much of England and Wales, but winds will drop in Scotland and Northern Ireland.

This, however, means a lot more rain will fall in these areas.

Steve continued: “It’s a bit hit and miss with thunderstorms where there’s fairly slack flow.

“It means that some areas will see very little rainfall. You could get away with a dry day if you’re lucky.

“But where they do fall, we will see a large amount of rainfall in a short period of time.

“That could lead to some localised flooding and also difficult driving conditions.

“It’s important people are aware that the potential for some heavy rain in a short period of time is possible.”

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