Home Science NASA simulator creates stunning sunsets from alien planets across the solar system 

NASA simulator creates stunning sunsets from alien planets across the solar system 

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A simulation created stunning sunsets from alien worlds across the solar system.

The animation transports viewers to the surface of Venus, Mars, Uranus and Saturn’s largest moon Titan, allowing them to witness the sun dip into the horizon.

As a planet rotates away from the sun’s light, photons scattered in different directions that produce an array of colors.

The sunset on Uranus is a light shade of blue that fades into a royal blue with hints of turquoise, while Titan’s starts as a vibrant yellow then shifts into a fiery red. 

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The animation transports viewers to the surface of Venus, Mars, Uranus and Saturn¿s largest moon Titan, allowing them to witness the sun dip into the horizon. As a planet rotates away from the sun¿s light, photons scattered in different directions that produce an array of colors

The animation transports viewers to the surface of Venus, Mars, Uranus and Saturn’s largest moon Titan, allowing them to witness the sun dip into the horizon. As a planet rotates away from the sun’s light, photons scattered in different directions that produce an array of colors

The simulation was developed by Geronimo Villanueva, a planetary scientists from NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center using a computer modelling tool that may be used for a future mission to Uranus. 

The tool, known as the Planetary Spectrum Generator, aims to help scientists understand how light moves through and interacts with cosmic object, including planets and comets.

Villanueva hopes the generator will one-day travel aboard a probe to Uranus, helping scientists interpret the measurements of light in the planet’s atmosphere to reveal its chemical makeup.

To test the tool, he simulated known sky colors of Uranus and other worlds.

The animations were created with a perspective of the person standing on each of the Martian world’s surface. 

In the video, a white dot is placed on all of the cosmic objects to represent the sun

In the video, a white dot is placed on all of the cosmic objects to represent the sun

The sunset on Uranus is a light shade of blue that fades into a royal blue with hints of turquoise, while Titan¿s starts as a vibrant yellow then shifts into a fiery red

The sunset on Uranus is a light shade of blue that fades into a royal blue with hints of turquoise, while Titan’s starts as a vibrant yellow then shifts into a fiery red

‘The animations show all-sky views as if you were looking up at the sky through a super wide camera lens from Earth, Venus, Mars, Uranus, and Titan,’ NASA shared in a statement.

In the video, a white dot is placed on all of the cosmic objects to represent the sun.

The halo of light seen towards the end of the sunset on hazy Earth is produced because of the way light is scattered by particles, including dust or fog, that are suspended in the clouds. 

And the he same is true of the Martian halo.

On Mars, the sunset turns from a brownish color to a blueish because the Martian dust particles scatter the blue color more effectively.

The halo of light seen towards the end of the sunset on hazy Earth is produced because of the way light is scattered by particles, including dust or fog, that are suspended in the clouds

The halo of light seen towards the end of the sunset on hazy Earth is produced because of the way light is scattered by particles, including dust or fog, that are suspended in the clouds

On Mars, the sunset turns from a brownish color to a blueish because the Martian dust particles scatter the blue color more effectively

On Mars, the sunset turns from a brownish color to a blueish because the Martian dust particles scatter the blue color more effectively

NASA previously released a stunning image of a sunrise on Mars.

On the 145th Martian day of its scientific mission, InSight took two photographs of the horizon: one on April 24th and another a few hours later on April 25th, in the evening and morning – both images were snapped last year. 

The sun looks especially small because it’s further away from Mars than the Earth so it is about two-thirds the size as seen on our planet.

NASA's stationary InSight lander captured what sunrise and sunset looks like on Mars in 2019. Stunning images taken from the Insight's robotic arm shows the Red Planet landscape and the sun rising and setting at the equivalent of 5:30 am. and 6:30 pm Mars local time

NASA’s stationary InSight lander captured what sunrise and sunset looks like on Mars in 2019. Stunning images taken from the Insight’s robotic arm shows the Red Planet landscape and the sun rising and setting at the equivalent of 5:30 am. and 6:30 pm Mars local time

Taking pictures of Martian sunsets is somewhat a rite of passage for landers on Mars.

It goes back to the Viking 1 lander, which snapped a photo of a Martian sunset in August 1976.

Viking 2 caught a sunrise in June 1978, and both events were also captured by the Spirit, Opportunity and Curiosity rovers.

‘It’s been a tradition for Mars missions to capture sunrises and sunsets,’ said Doctor Maki in the NASA announcement

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