Oscars get political as Maya Rudolph mocks Donald Trump quipping ‘Mexico is not paying for the wall’

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IT didn’t take long for the Oscars to get political.

Although the ceremony was host-free this year, presenters Maya Rudolph, Amy Poehler and Tina Fey didn’t shy away from divisive topics in the opening segment.

Maya Rudolph was quick to make a dig at Donald Trump
Getty Images – Getty

Maya Rudolph was quick to make a dig at Donald Trump[/caption]

Although the ceremony was host-free this year, presenters Maya Rudolph, Amy Poehler and Tina Fey didn't shy away from divisive topics in the opening segment
Getty Images – Getty

Although the ceremony was host-free this year, presenters Maya Rudolph, Amy Poehler and Tina Fey didn’t shy away from divisive topics in the opening segment[/caption]

Rudolph was quick to take aim at Donald Trump, quipping: “Mexico is not paying for the wall”.

The Bridesmaids actress was not the only star to make a dig at the controversial border wall with Mexico that Trump promised during his 2016 presidential campaign.

Spanish actor Javier Bardem also made a subtle reference to the wall while introducing the nominees for best foreign language film.

Speaking in his native tongue, he said: “There are no borders or walls that stop ingenuity and talent.

Spanish actor Javier Bardem also made a subtle reference to the wall while introducing the nominees for best foreign language film.
Getty Images – Getty

Spanish actor Javier Bardem also made a subtle reference to the wall while introducing the nominees for best foreign language film[/caption]

“In each region there are stories that move us and tonight we celebrate the excellence and importance of the language of different countries.”

There was a huge cheer when Mexican film Roma was announced as the winner in that category.

The black-and-white Netflix film, directed and written by Alfonso Cuaron, marked Mexico’s first Oscar victory in the category and has already picked up a slew of other awards this year.

The film was inspired by Cuaron’s childhood and a domestic worker who helped raise him. It features a largely unknown or amateur cast.

The title is taken from the Mexico City Colonia Roma neighborhood where Cuaron grew up.


“Roma” stars Yalitza Aparicio as a domestic worker named Cleo who becomes pregnant as she cares for a family with four children as the parents are splitting up.

Political turmoil in Mexico serves as a backdrop, with Cleo witnessing a 1971 massacre of protesters that marked the beginning of a “dirty war” against dissenters.

The film depicts her character speaking in the indigenous language of Mixtec.

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