Home Science Partners who feel appreciated have more sex, study suggests

Partners who feel appreciated have more sex, study suggests

0


Partners who feel appreciated by one another have a better bond in the bedroom, as gratitude motivates people to fulfil their partner’s sexual needs, a study suggested. 

Researchers from North Carolina in the US performed a series of surveys exploring the nature of participating couples’ relationships and sexual bonds.

The team found that expressing and receiving gratitude towards/from one’s partner — such as via compliments or treats — can keep help boost intimate relations.

The work builds on previous studies which concluded that a sense of thankfulness and gratitude within a relationship was also key to commitment and responsiveness.

Couples that feel appreciated by each other have a better bond in the bedroom, as gratitude motivated people fulfil their partner's sexual needs, a study suggested (stock image)

Couples that feel appreciated by each other have a better bond in the bedroom, as gratitude motivated people fulfil their partner’s sexual needs, a study suggested (stock image)

‘I became interested in this topic because I think it is applicable to many people,’ explained paper author and social psychologist Ashlyn Brady of the University of North Carolina at Greensboro told PsyPost.

‘Over the course of a romantic relationship, people will likely experience times when they do not feel sexually satisfied — and this can be harmful to their overall relationship satisfaction.’

‘Recent findings suggest that having the motivation to fulfil a partner’s sexual needs  — i.e., ‘sexual communal strength’ — may help buffer romantic couples from experiencing these normative declines in sexual satisfaction.’

‘However, it was still unknown how people could enhance their motivation to fulfil their partner’s sexual needs.’

In the first part of their study, Ms Brady and colleagues surveyed 185 participants — recruited via Amazon’s crowd-sourcing ‘Mechanical Turk’ service — about the nature of their relationships with their partners.

They found that those people who agreed more strongly with such statements as ‘My partner often tells me the things that she or he really likes about me’ and ‘I appreciate my partner’ were more likely to want to fulfil their partner’s sexual needs.

Next, the team surveyed 118 heterosexual couples three times over a three month period, finding that changes in sexual communal strength improved over time with when couples felt and expressed gratitude towards each other.

Finally, Ms Brady and colleagues performed an online experiment asking 285 individuals to answer questions about the strength of their sexual bond with their partner — after either being made to write about a recent experience.

They found that the participants who were asked to write about an experience where they felt gratitude towards their partner — or felt that their partner was grateful for them — were more likely to report a stronger sexual bond than those who did not. 

‘Finding the motivation to fulfil a romantic partner’s sexual needs may be challenging at times, but it’s important to remember that there are simple steps that can be taken to enhance this motivation,’ Ms Brady told PsyPost.

‘Our results suggest that gratitude, an emotion that arises in response to the recognition that another person has been beneficial or valuable to us, is one factor that predicts greater sexual communal strength.’

‘Thus, simply experiencing gratitude toward, or receiving gratitude from, a romantic partner can increase your motivation to fulfil your partner’s sexual needs and can help maintain this motivation over time.’

'Finding the motivation to fulfil a romantic partner¿s sexual needs may be challenging at times, but it¿s important to remember that there are simple steps that can be taken to enhance this motivation,' Ms Brady told PsyPost.'Our results suggest that gratitude, an emotion that arises in response to the recognition that another person has been beneficial or valuable to us, is one factor that predicts greater sexual communal strength'

‘Finding the motivation to fulfil a romantic partner’s sexual needs may be challenging at times, but it’s important to remember that there are simple steps that can be taken to enhance this motivation,’ Ms Brady told PsyPost. ‘Our results suggest that gratitude, an emotion that arises in response to the recognition that another person has been beneficial or valuable to us, is one factor that predicts greater sexual communal strength’

The researchers cautioned, however, that variety may also be needed to keep up the strength of their sexual bond, couples may need variety as well.

‘For example, you may feel especially grateful for a romantic partner after the first time they make you dinner, but those grateful feelings may not be as influential after your romantic partner prepares dinner every night for many years,’ Ms Brady added.

‘We suggest that gratitude broadly has the ability to enhance the motivation to fulfil a partner’s sexual needs; however, whether one type of gratitude is more influential than the other is also an important question to consider.’

The full findings of the study were published in the journal Social Psychological and Personality Science.

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here