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Slow-motion footage captures an Apple Watch Series 5 'coughing' out droplets of water

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Slow-motion footage captures an Apple Watch Series 5 ‘coughing’ out droplets of water in bursts through the device’s speaker

  • The Apple Watch Series 5 is water resistant up to 164 feet of water 
  • YouTubers wanted to take a closer look into how the device protects itself
  • They used a micro lens and slowed the footage down by 80 times
  • The clip shows tiny droplets of water being forced out of the device in one burst
  • The speaker pulls the droplets in and pauses for a moment before expelling 
  • The YouTubers noted that the device does this for 10 full cycles  

Apple has boasted that its fifth generation Apple Watch is water resistant up to 164 feet, allowing users to swim and shower while wearing the device.

The tech giant implemented a mechanism in the speakers that ‘coughs’ out water – and a video captured the liquid being ejected in slow motion.

YouTubers, known as The Slow Mo Guys, used a micro lens to get a close look at the speaker and slowed the footage speed down by 80 times.

The video shows multiple tiny droplets of water being forced out of the device in one burst.

The mechanism inside the speaker pulls some of the droplets in and pauses for a moment before expelling more water out – the Apple Watch completes this cycle 10 times.

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The tech giant implemented tiny speakers that ‘cough’ out water that may flow into the device – and a video captured the liquid being ejected in slow motion

The tech giant implemented tiny speakers that ‘cough’ out water that may flow into the device – and a video captured the liquid being ejected in slow motion

‘Apple Watch Series 5 is designed with swimmers in mind,’ Apple shares on its website.

‘The Pool Swim workout automatically records splits and sets and can actually recognize your stroke.

‘The Open Water Swim workout visualizes your route on a map.

‘And both precisely track active calories, distance, and overall pace.’

Apple has boasted that its fifth generation Apple Watch (pictured) offers water resistance up to 164 feet, allowing users to swim and shower while wearing the device

Apple has boasted that its fifth generation Apple Watch (pictured) offers water resistance up to 164 feet, allowing users to swim and shower while wearing the device

The video shows multiple tiny droplets of water being forced out of the device in one burst.

The video shows multiple tiny droplets of water being forced out of the device in one burst.

Gav, the host of The Slow Mo Guys, takes a swim in a bath tub while wearing an Apple Watch Series 5 to submerge the device in water.

The face of the Watch reads ‘Turn Digital Crown to unlock and eject water.’

He points the camera on the speakers that line the sides of the Apple Watch and watched the device work its magic.

‘I was immediately blown away by how much water actually came out in this shot,’ Gave said as droplets came spilling out of the side.

The footage shows the speakers up close, which appear to be pulsating as droplets are ejected.

There is an initial burst of water, but the mechanism sucks the water back in and traps it inside the speakers.

‘What it does is stops, allowing the water to settle into the back of the speaker and then starts again, which causes another burst of water to fire,’ explains Gav.

He notes that the Apple Watch does 10 full cycles of this process.

‘I think due to the sharp edge of the speaker hole, followed by the metallic surface that’s curved it causes droplets to form around the speaker holes, which once big enough would just drip off.’

The mechanism inside the speaker pulls some of the droplets in and pauses for a moment before expelling more water out – the Apple Watch completes this cycle 10 times

The mechanism inside the speaker pulls some of the droplets in and pauses for a moment before expelling more water out – the Apple Watch completes this cycle 10 times

‘I think if you were wearing the Watch at this point, it would potentially just get pulled off onto your wrist.’

The droplets are very small, but under the macro lense they look much larger, Gav explains.

The footage also shows that the droplets climbed upwards in some instances and whichever one was closets to the lip, pulled the others behind it out.

Gav also tested the functionality while the Watch was submerged in water and it again forced the water out in the form of bubbles.

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