Syrian tyrant Assad ‘committing war crimes by dropping cluster bombs’ on hospitals killing hundreds, UK ambassador warns

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A UK ambassador has warned Syrian tyrant President Assad could be “committing war crimes by dropping cluster bombs” on hospitals.

Recent evidence suggests hundreds have been killed in hospitals and schools in Idlib after being deliberately attacked by the Syrian regime.

Destruction at the entrance of a hospital in the village of Kafr Nabl, south of the jihadist-held Syrian province of Idlib
Getty – Contributor
A Russian air strike on an underground hospital in Idlib has forced the closure of the facility, a medical organisation and war monitor said
Getty – Contributor
Damaged vehicles and buildings are seen at the site after the air attacks carried out by Assad Regime warplanes over the de-escalation zone of Saraqib district in Idlib
Getty – Contributor

Ambassador Dame Karen Pierce told Sky News: “Direct targeting of hospitals and schools… may be a war crime.

“So we’ve been calling on the Syrians and the Russians to make sure they act in accordance with international humanitarian law”.

She called the findings “pretty shocking” and a “violation of international humanitarian law”.

According to Dame Karen, Russian authorities put pressure on the Syrian government to comply with these issues.

But she said Assad’s regime “doesn’t listen and ultimately this will have its place in accountability for crimes against humanity and possibly war crimes”.

HOSPITALS ATTACKED

She added that work was continuing to prevent Syria targeting civilians and secure another ceasefire.

In 2017, a senior US official claimed Russian officials knew about Assad’s plans to launch a chemical attack on his own people, including hospitals.

A drone operated by Russia was reportedly flown over the hospital as the injured rushed for treatment.

Hours later a Russian-made fighter jet bombed the health centre.

The official said the presence of the surveillance drone couldn’t have been a coincidence, and that Russia must have known the chemical weapons attack was coming.

Ruthless president Assad has killed nearly 100,000 of his own people and driven millions more out of Syria.

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However, despite mounting atrocities and international sanctions Vladimir Putin has put on a united front with the troubled tyrant.

Russian support in Syria increased dramatically following the Arab Spring uprisings which began in 2011.

When Gaddafi was overthrown in Libya, Russia saw the move as an attack on its influence in the middle east.

Putin had a long-term relationship with Gaddafi and had several billion dollars’ worth of arms sales pending.

He soon started to look for allies –  and new customers  – elsewhere in the region. Assad and Syria were the obvious choice.

Moscow also feared a rise in radical extremism if the under-threat Assad regime was ever toppled.

ONGOING CONFLICT

The main sides in the Syrian conflict are President Assad’s official Syrian army, Isis and Syrian rebel factions.

Some of these rebel groups are backed by al-Qaeda while other groups are supported by the West.

The US is said to have 2,000 troops on the ground offering support to those battling ISIS.

Russia is also there to fight against Isis, however they also attack other anti-Assad rebels, including those backed by the US.

Iran is also a powerful backer of the Assad regime as both are from the Shia branch of Islam as opposed to the Sunni religion of Isis and Saudi Arabia.

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In May 2018, Iranian Quds forces based in Syria launched a 20 rockets attack on Israel.

None of the rockets hit any targets and Israeli aircraft responded by extensively hitting both Syrian and Iranian military sites in Syria.

The Syrian city of Aleppo was destroyed a mass-slaughter of local people after four years of brutal street fighting and aerial bombardments.

Tens of thousands of homes and apartments were left uninhabitable, most factories were looted or destroyed and some ancient landmarks reduced to rubble.


Located at the crossroads of ancient trade routes, Aleppo was Syria’s biggest city before the war, with more than 3 million residents and a world-famous cuisine.

It served as the country’s industrial hub, home to factories producing textiles, plastics and pharmaceuticals. Its ancient center, recognized as a World Heritage site, drew large numbers of tourists.

In December 2016, Maamoun Abdul-Karim, head of the government’s museums and archaeology department, said Aleppo “resembles those cities that were stricken during World War II.”

An injured man is pulled out from a collapsed building, in a location said to be Sfuhen, Idlib province, Syria
Reuters
An injured young man is carried by White Helmet rescue worker
Reuters
A satellite overview image of Kafr Nabudah, Idlib Province, Syria on May 20, before significant bomb damage
Reuters
The same area, taken on May 26, during a Syrian government offensive
Reuters
A satellite overview image of Hbit, Idlib Province, Syria May 20
Reuters
A satellite overview image of the same area that shows smoke from fires on May 26
Reuters
Civil defence crews and locals conduct search and rescue works after airstrikes by Assad Regime hit the de-escalation zone of Ariha
Getty – Contributor
A man carries a child while leaving the area after airstrikes by Assad Regime hit
Getty – Contributor
White helmet rescue volunteers and civilians search for survivors amidst the rubble of a building destroyed during an air strike
AFP or licensors

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