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US set to witness the last full moon of the summer TONIGHT – dubbed 'corn moon' by Native Americans

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US set to witness the last full moon of the summer TONIGHT – dubbed ‘corn moon’ by Native Americans because it signifies crops are ready for harvest

The last full moon of the summer is set to appear in the night sky across the US Tuesday.

Called the ‘corn moon,’ the lunar spectacle, coined by the Native America Algonquin tribes , signified the time to harvest staple crops.

The full moon is set to peak at 1:22pm ET, Wednesday and will be visible for three consecutive nights – the last day it will show its full face is September 3.

Skywatchers will also be able to feast their eyes on a bright Jupiter and fainter Saturn, which will appear after 8pm ET in the south-southeast.

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The last full moon of the summer is set to appear in the night sky across the US Tuesday. Pictured is the event over Red Square in the capital city Moscow, Russia on September 01, 2020

The last full moon of the summer is set to appear in the night sky across the US Tuesday. Pictured is the event over Red Square in the capital city Moscow, Russia on September 01, 2020

September’s first full moon has come early, as the Harvest moon typically takes the lead on the 22nd.

And because the lunar sphere will be full September 1, it is instead called the corn moon.

‘Historically, some Native Americans gave a name to each month’s full Moon, naming it in relation to a natural event or sign of the season,’ according to The Farmer’s Almanac.

‘This aided them in tracking the progression of the year. Different peoples had different names, reflecting the areas where they lived.’

The name was used as it signifies the time corn is typically harvest, but it has also been called the barley moon as barley is ready to be picked. Because the US is inching towards the autumn equinox, there will be shorter-than-usual time between moonrises over the next few days Pictured is the event of Istanbul, Turkey

The name was used as it signifies the time corn is typically harvest, but it has also been called the barley moon as barley is ready to be picked. Because the US is inching towards the autumn equinox, there will be shorter-than-usual time between moonrises over the next few days Pictured is the event of Istanbul, Turkey

The name was used as it signifies the time corn is typically harvest, but it has also been called the barley moon as barley is ready to be picked.

Because the US is inching towards the autumn equinox, there will be shorter-than-usual time between moonrises over the next few days, EarthSky reports.

However, the change will not be fully noticed until October when it is more pronounced.

Along with the corn moon, spectators may have a chance at seeing a bright Jupiter and faint Saturn Tuesday night as well.

‘As evening twilight ends, the bright planet Jupiter and the fainter planet Saturn will appear in the south-southeast, with Jupiter to the right about 27 degrees above the horizon and Saturn on the left about 26 degrees above the horizon,’ NASA said.

‘The planet Mercury will have already set, but might be visible earlier in the evening (about 30 minutes after sunset), low on the western horizon. The bright star appearing almost exactly overhead will be Vega, the brightest of the stars of the ‘Summer Triangle.’

Along with the corn moon, spectators may have a chance at seeing a bright Jupiter and faint Saturn Tuesday night as well. Pictured is the moon over Istanbul, Turkey

Along with the corn moon, spectators may have a chance at seeing a bright Jupiter and faint Saturn Tuesday night as well. Pictured is the moon over Istanbul, Turkey

The early September moon is also setting the stage for the highly rare blue moon that is expected to appear on Halloween, October 21.

‘Most Blue Moons look pale gray and white, indistinguishable from any other moon you’ve ever seen,’ according to NASA.

‘Squeezing a second full moon into a calendar month doesn’t change the physical properties of the moon itself, so the color remains the same.’

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